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British Airways introduces executive passenger safety course

British-Airway

Taking pre-flight safety briefings to their ultimate conclusion, the airline has offered its customers places on the course for the price of a return ticket from Gatwick to Rome – about £125.

From airmiles to upgrades, frequent fliers already enjoy a host of benefits. But the latest one on offer could be the most valuable yet.

British Airways is to offer members of its exclusive Executive Club the chance to take part in a four-hour air safety training session, it has emerged.

British Airways is offering members of its Executive Club a safety training course which could help them, as well as fellow passengers, survive in the event of a crash. The four-hour long session covers a range of procedures from properly releasing a seatbelt to locating a life jacket. The training lesson ends with a simulated evacuation of the cabin.

The flag carrier has introduced the course after BP said it would like its employees to have better training in how to deal with an emergency. The oil company said that it sent workers around the globe, and that sometimes they had to travel on airlines which did not have very rigorous safety standards.

Manager in charge of the course, Andy Clubb, said the training meant that passengers felt more confident when flying and also made them safer. He explained that contrary to public belief, most airline accidents are survivable and most deaths occur in the panic which ensues after a crash.

Mr Clubb went on to say that as well as being better able to look after themselves, passengers who have had the proper training would also be able to look after fellow travellers if an emergency occurred. He said that just seeing someone confident about what they are doing helps other passengers to react in a positive way.

There has not been a fatal airline accident involving a British carrier since 1989. The incident involved a passenger jet owned by British Midland and occurred near Kegworth in Leicestershire where 47 people lost their lives.